Author Topic: What to do if stopped for speeding?  (Read 351 times)

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S.M

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What to do if stopped for speeding?
« on: November 09, 2023, 06:36:35 pm »
Hello Folks,

Bit of advice, what do we normally have to do if we are stopped by either a bike or patrol car for speeding?

Do we have to accept and sign everything?

A friend of mine was stopped by the police for apparently going 48 in a 40 zone. He did mention to the Police that this was a 50 mph stretch. As he was getting late for school drop offs, he didn`t argue and signed whatever they gave him.

When he received the papers, they put the actual speed at 56 instead of 48 and in a 50 mph zone. When he called to query, they mentioned something about calibration. He didn`t proceed further and just took it on the chin - This was beginning last year.

What do we do when we are stopped?

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cp8759

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Re: What to do if stopped for speeding?
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2023, 12:33:56 am »
You do realise that signing makes no difference?

I'd suggest just being polite and accepting whatever disposal is proposed. If for argument's sake the story you've been told is 100% accurate, by saying nothing and letting the officer put down 48 in a 40, he could have potentially got off scott free.

The fact of the matter is that if the officer has decided he's enforcing, unless you have diplomatic immunity or are on your way to the hospital because you've had the dreaded call saying to get there to say your goodbyes to a loved one before it's too late, then it's unlikely there is anything you can say will change his mind, but if he's not yet made his mind up then the difference between a polite complaint driver vs an argumentative one could be the difference between a warning and the officer thinking "right, I'm throwing the book at you".

I've seen people get away with a warning at 43 in a 30 and 90 in a 70 simply because they passed the attitude test.
I practice law in the Traffic Penalty Tribunal, London Tribunals, the First-tier tribunal for Scotland, and the Traffic Penalty Tribunal for Northern Ireland, but I am not a solicitor nor a barrister. Notwithstanding this, I voluntarily apply the cab rank rule. I am a member of the Society of Professional McKenzie Friends, my membership number is FM193.

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guest46

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Re: What to do if stopped for speeding?
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2023, 08:40:35 am »
As above. Although I've avoided a roadside pull for many years, my approach was and remains, polite compliant. I escaped a marginal DUI charge many years ago this way.

When asked questions, reply politelym without being daft! E.g. if asked 'Do you know why I've stopped you?' replying 'Yes, I was doing 90 mph in this 40 zone' is a bit daft, 'Dunno you tell me!' is similarly daft, whereas 'I do not officer, please advise me' is a good start.

I don't carry my driving licence and it's old-school paper so when asked to producewill usually get told I've committed an offence (true)but I'll wait for the policeman to add that the law allows a 5-day perriod to produce it at a police office of my choice, rather than ranting about not needing to carry it and the ills of Government ID carying by stealth etc etc.

They are allowed to verify you are who you claim to be and I've done this via credit cards and/or an insurance document in the glove box.

Although it must occasionally happen that folk are pulled over in error, I assume they've 'got me' and act accordingly. Ranting and trying for some arcane escape waffle rarely ends well!

S.M

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Re: What to do if stopped for speeding?
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2023, 10:54:08 pm »
You do realise that signing makes no difference?

I'd suggest just being polite and accepting whatever disposal is proposed. If for argument's sake the story you've been told is 100% accurate, by saying nothing and letting the officer put down 48 in a 40, he could have potentially got off scott free.

The fact of the matter is that if the officer has decided he's enforcing, unless you have diplomatic immunity or are on your way to the hospital because you've had the dreaded call saying to get there to say your goodbyes to a loved one before it's too late, then it's unlikely there is anything you can say will change his mind, but if he's not yet made his mind up then the difference between a polite complaint driver vs an argumentative one could be the difference between a warning and the officer thinking "right, I'm throwing the book at you".

I've seen people get away with a warning at 43 in a 30 and 90 in a 70 simply because they passed the attitude test.

So they would actually show you what you are getting into trouble for i.e the speed they have clocked you and not like a blank screen to sign on. Yes he didn`t argue but just politely mentioned to the officer about the speed limit.

As above. Although I've avoided a roadside pull for many years, my approach was and remains, polite compliant. I escaped a marginal DUI charge many years ago this way.

When asked questions, reply politelym without being daft! E.g. if asked 'Do you know why I've stopped you?' replying 'Yes, I was doing 90 mph in this 40 zone' is a bit daft, 'Dunno you tell me!' is similarly daft, whereas 'I do not officer, please advise me' is a good start.

I don't carry my driving licence and it's old-school paper so when asked to producewill usually get told I've committed an offence (true)but I'll wait for the policeman to add that the law allows a 5-day perriod to produce it at a police office of my choice, rather than ranting about not needing to carry it and the ills of Government ID carying by stealth etc etc.

They are allowed to verify you are who you claim to be and I've done this via credit cards and/or an insurance document in the glove box.

Although it must occasionally happen that folk are pulled over in error, I assume they've 'got me' and act accordingly. Ranting and trying for some arcane escape waffle rarely ends well!

Oh yeah politeness and being compliant is a good approach.

Thanks

guest46

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Re: What to do if stopped for speeding?
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2023, 05:10:53 am »
They won't always show you anything as the opinion of two officers (non-motorway) will suffice. Most will report the lower speed rathe rthan the highest acheived/estimated though.