Author Topic: Driving my father in laws car  (Read 209 times)

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Korting

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Driving my father in laws car
« on: June 28, 2024, 09:41:16 pm »
Quick question.

In January my Father in Law who is 92 moved into a care home and stopped driving.  We have SORNED his car

We now need to sell the car.

The carís MOT has expired.

Obviously we would get insurance but my question is can I drive it to my home and then get the MOT tester to collect it, or do we have to take it straight to a (pre booked) MOT testing station?

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slapdash

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Re: Driving my father in laws car
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2024, 06:21:38 am »
You may only drive a SORNed vehicle to (or back from) a pre-booked MOT.

You may have DOV cover and that may be appropriate.

Ensure any insurance doesn't contain an MOT clause, some do.

« Last Edit: June 29, 2024, 06:23:53 am by slapdash »

cp8759

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Re: Driving my father in laws car
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2024, 04:08:40 pm »
Be very careful with insurance, while some companies have a very wide DOV clause, most companies require that the vehicle must have a substantive policy of its own for your DOV cover to be valid. If in doubt, you can get a daily policy for as little as £15 for a day's cover.

You must drive the vehicle straight from wherever it is now on private property to the MOT centre and back (and the test must be pre-booked). If required you're allowed to stop en-route at a petrol station (if you don't have enough fuel to get there), but that's pretty much it, there is no scope for any other sort of deviation.
I practice law in the Traffic Penalty Tribunal, London Tribunals, the First-tier tribunal for Scotland, and the Traffic Penalty Tribunal for Northern Ireland, but I am not a solicitor nor a barrister. Notwithstanding this, I voluntarily apply the cab rank rule. I am a member of the Society of Professional McKenzie Friends, my membership number is FM193.

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andy_foster

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Re: Driving my father in laws car
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2024, 04:44:17 pm »
Unless the law (case law) has changed, driving to the pre-booked MoT must be the predominant purpose of the journey. Stopping off en-route to do some shopping (for example) would generally be considered incidental, although it would be a matter of fact and degree - driving to the South of France to buy an icecream would not.

However, on the face of it, minor diversions to a journey to the MoT station would appear to be irrelevant if you are not actually driving it to the MoT station.
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Korting

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Re: Driving my father in laws car
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2024, 05:52:32 pm »
Thank you all for your replies.

After the MOT, does the vehicle have to go back to the address from where it came or can it be driven to another address and kept there?

cp8759

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Re: Driving my father in laws car
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2024, 07:33:46 pm »
Thank you all for your replies.

After the MOT, does the vehicle have to go back to the address from where it came or can it be driven to another address and kept there?
If the car has passed then it can be driven wherever as it would have an MOT certificate. If VED is purchased immediately, it could even be parked on the road.

If it's failed it can only be driven back to where it came from, or to a place of repair. Your home might be a place of repair if you're going to fix it yourself once it's there (which would be applicable if it's something trivial like changing a light bulb or fitting a new windscreen wiper).
I practice law in the Traffic Penalty Tribunal, London Tribunals, the First-tier tribunal for Scotland, and the Traffic Penalty Tribunal for Northern Ireland, but I am not a solicitor nor a barrister. Notwithstanding this, I voluntarily apply the cab rank rule. I am a member of the Society of Professional McKenzie Friends, my membership number is FM193.

Quote from: 'Gumph' date='Thu, 19 Jan 2023 - 10:23'
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